Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing

Each has a literature that confronts the essence of its lonely pursuit and explores the way the solitude and self-discipline these sports demand grow the spirit and fill the competitor. Fishing. The raw elements of the sport are our teacher: the wind and the water, the boat and its oars, our own bodies and minds.” Given those elements, it’s no surprise that the education is a profound one. The superficial journey here is over water; the real one is internal.

In this wise and thrilling book, Craig Lambert turns rowing–personal discipline, modern Olympic sport, grand collegiate tradition, and fitness pursuit for thousands of men and women–into a metaphor for a vigorous and satisfying life. The raw elements of the sport are our teachers: the wind and the water, the boat and its oars, our own bodies and minds.”–from Mind Over Water

Product Information:

Author’s Bio: 

To view this book on Amazon.com, click here.. Golf, certainly. “Like Einstein,” he writes, “we wish to know God’s thoughts. We shall attempt to pry them loose with an oar. Filled with humor and imagination, Mind Over Water speaks to rowers and non-rowers alike. Lambert’s graceful reflection on rowing is a lovely addition to the genre, part memoir, part narrative, part celebration of a relatively arcane endeavor, and utterly provocative. –Jeff Silverman

“Like Einstein, we wish to know God’s thoughts. Long-distance running, of course.

Craig Lambert, a staff writer and editor at Harvard Magazine, has also written for Sports Illustrated and Town & Country. This is a book about balance, attaining consistency and speed, independence and cooperation, joy and creative powers. He trains and races in single sculls on the Charles River in Boston, and occasionally competes in major rowing events, such as the Head of the Charles Regatta.

Amazon.com Review:

Some sports–the solitary ones, in particular–are simply more prone to mysticism and mystery than others. The surprise is how accessible and appealing it turns out to be. Climbing. We shall attempt to pry them loose with an oar. Skimming the plane where sky and water meet, rowers must fully inhabit the present moment, whether facing their demons in a single scull or discovering the paradoxes of teamwork and commitment in a crew shell

Leave a Reply

Post Navigation